Who's On Line

We have 99 guests and no members online

Login Form

MailChimp

Subscribe to Newsletter
Please wait

Whitechapel murder: Two men arrested after woman found dead in east London flat

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

uk flaguk flaguk flag uk flaguk flaguk flaguk flag

Whitechapel murder: Two men arrested after woman found dead in east London flat

A woman was found killed in an east London flat after residents heard “bloodcurdling” screams and police officers swooped on the property. 

Two men said to be known to the victim were arrested on suspicion of murder and were being questioned at separate police stations on Monday.

Officers were called to the housing block on Ellen Street, Whitechapel just before 8.30am on Sunday after concerns were raised about the woman’s welfare.

The victim, thought to be in her thirties or forties, found unresponsive inside the flat in Hadfield House and pronounced dead at the scene.

She is believed to have suffered a number of injuries, including stab wounds.  

A ground-floor resident said: “I was woken by a massive commotion. I thought it was local boys shouting but then I heard a name and a woman.  

“I couldn’t work out what they were saying but it was loud and sounded violent, there were bloodcurdling screams.” 

Another said: “We heard shouting and screaming then police were literally everywhere.” 

Detectives believe they know her identity and are working to inform next of kin. A post-mortem examination will be scheduled in due course.  

A man, in his thirties, was arrested near the scene and remains in custody at an east London police station.  

A 24-year-old man is being questioned at a south London police station.  

Met homicide detectives said the deceased and arrested men are believed to have been known to each other.  

Forensic officers were today seen searching for clues and sifting through rubbish in the communal bin area. 

A police cordon remained in place around Ellen Street. Officers guarded several doors in the four first block. 

Reference: Evening Standard: John Dunne and Anthony France  

We use cookies on our website. Some of them are essential for the operation of the site, while others help us to improve this site and the user experience (tracking cookies). You can decide for yourself whether you want to allow cookies or not. Please note that if you reject them, you may not be able to use all the functionalities of the site.

Ok
X

Right Click

No right click